My Cart

Close

Victrola Journey Bluetooth® Record Player, 3-Speed Turntable + Vinyl Storage

$140.00

Available in store in San Francisco or shipping worldwide!

The Victrola Journey+ Bluetooth Record Player combines classic portable turntable design with loads of new features! Dual Bluetooth connectivity allows you to stream your favorite vinyl records to any external Bluetooth speaker, or stream music from a smart device through the built-in stereo speakers, so you can truly make your listening experience your own. The 3-speed turntable plays all 33 1/3, 45, and 78 RPM records, or plug in your favorite pair of headphones. The Journey+ is equipped with an easy-carry handle, and its portable design means you can take your tunes on the go, for lasting music memories wherever you may be. Includes matching Victrola Bridge record holder for easy vinyl storage!

Available In Store Only at this time. Please contact for special requests.

History of Victrola:
The company was founded by engineer Eldridge R. Johnson, who had been manufacturing gramophones for inventor Emile Berliner, to play his disc records. After a series of legal wranglings between Berliner, Johnson and their former business partners, the two joined to form the Consolidated Talking Machine Co. in order to combine Berliner's patents for the disc record and Gramophone, along with Johnson's patents for improving its performance and fidelity. The Victor Talking Machine Co. was incorporated officially on October 3, 1901 shortly before an agreement with Columbia Records to share their various disc record patents.

In September 1906, Victor introduced a new line of talking machines with the turntable and amplifying horn tucked away inside a wooden cabinet, the horn being completely invisible. This was not done for reasons of audio fidelity, but for visual aesthetics. The intention was to produce a phonograph that looked less like a piece of machinery and more like a piece of furniture. These internal horn machines, trademarked with the name Victrola, were first marketed to the public in September of that year and were an immediate hit. Soon an extensive line of Victrolas was available, ranging from small tabletop models selling for $15, through many sizes and designs of cabinets intended to go with the decor of middle-class homes in the $100 to $250 range, up to $600 Chippendale and Queen Anne-style cabinets of fine wood with gold trim designed to look at home in elegant mansions. Victrolas became by far the most popular type of home phonograph, and sold in great numbers until the end of the 1920s. RCA Victor continued to market record players under the Victrola name until the late 1960s.

Hello You!

Join our mailing list